Ruddick

Homework, Tests & Assignments

English 536-02

Homework Due date

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings -- Final Test

Wed, 05/17/2017

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings -- Reading Schedule

Novel Study: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

Reading Schedule

Chapters 1-6 – March 14th

Chapters 7-12 – March 24th

Chapters 13-17 – April 3rd

Chapters 18-21 – April 10th

Chapters 22-24 – April 18th

Chapters 25-29 – April 25th

Chapters 30-33 – May 1st

Chapters 34-36 – May 8th

Final Test – May 17th

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Wed, 05/24/2017

English 36E-10

Homework Due date

List of Abstract Nouns

Download the attached document. 

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Mon, 06/05/2017

Vocabulary List describing Tone & Mood

Download the attached document.

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Mon, 06/05/2017

Response Writing Instructions

Responses to a Literary Text: See the attached instructions as well:)

What can I write about when I’m writing a response to a literary text?

Where do I begin?

1. Ask questions to yourself in writing, about the characters and about the categories the characters belong to.

Ex. Don’t Breathe (film): main characters are college students. ‘Young Adults’ is the category the characters belong to.

Questions: What does this text say about the experiences of young adults living in society today?   

                What does this text say about the experiences of children attending school?   

What does this text say about the experiences of children who lose things?

Answer these questions by exploring possible answers and by referring to the text for details   

2. Use the List of Abstract Nouns to find words that fit the main topics of the text. Explain what you think the text says about these concepts/ideas. Your explanation will be similar to describing a theme. 

Ex. If the text and its characters experience loss, explain what the text and its situations suggest about the idea of loss. 

3. Find words in the text that suggest the author/speaker’s tone about the subject of the text or the situation. Describe the mood that the words make you feel about the text or situation in the text.

  • Use the Vocabulary List of Words Describing Tone
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Mon, 06/05/2017

Literary Essay: Descriptive Outline

Please download the attached document:)

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Mon, 06/05/2017

Response Writing Instructions

Responses to a Literary Text: See the attached instructions as well:)

What can I write about when I’m writing a response to a literary text?

Where do I begin?

1. Ask questions to yourself in writing, about the characters and about the categories the characters belong to.

Ex. Don’t Breathe (film): main characters are college students. ‘Young Adults’ is the category the characters belong to.

Questions: What does this text say about the experiences of young adults living in society today?   

                What does this text say about the experiences of children attending school?   

What does this text say about the experiences of children who lose things?

Answer these questions by exploring possible answers and by referring to the text for details   

2. Use the List of Abstract Nouns to find words that fit the main topics of the text. Explain what you think the text says about these concepts/ideas. Your explanation will be similar to describing a theme. 

Ex. If the text and its characters experience loss, explain what the text and its situations suggest about the idea of loss. 

3. Find words in the text that suggest the author/speaker’s tone about the subject of the text or the situation. Describe the mood that the words make you feel about the text or situation in the text.

  • Use the Vocabulary List of Words Describing Tone
| view
Fri, 06/16/2017

English 306-03

Homework Due date

List of Abstract Nouns

Download the attached document.

| view
Mon, 06/05/2017

Vocabulary List describing Tone & Mood

Download the attached document.

| view
Mon, 06/05/2017

Response Writing Instructions

Responses to a Literary Text: See the attached instructions as well:)

What can I write about when I’m writing a response to a literary text?

Where do I begin?

1. Ask questions to yourself in writing, about the characters and about the categories the characters belong to.

Ex. Don’t Breathe (film): main characters are college students. ‘Young Adults’ is the category the characters belong to.

Questions: What does this text say about the experiences of young adults living in society today?   

                What does this text say about the experiences of children attending school?   

What does this text say about the experiences of children who lose things?

Answer these questions by exploring possible answers and by referring to the text for details   

2. Use the List of Abstract Nouns to find words that fit the main topics of the text. Explain what you think the text says about these concepts/ideas. Your explanation will be similar to describing a theme. 

Ex. If the text and its characters experience loss, explain what the text and its situations suggest about the idea of loss. 

3. Find words in the text that suggest the author/speaker’s tone about the subject of the text or the situation. Describe the mood that the words make you feel about the text or situation in the text.

  • Use the Vocabulary List of Words Describing Tone
| view
Fri, 06/16/2017