Library

Welcome to Westmount High School Library !

"There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book.
Books are well written or badly written."

- Oscar Wilde, (1854 - 1900)

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The library is an inviting and relaxing environment with the new addition of a Reading Lounge for students to sit and read comfortably in a space of their own. Students can enjoy a wide range of books in the collection, from the newest editions of popular manga, magazines, newspapers, to contemporary and classic fiction. There is also a diverse and informative range of non-fiction materials for general interest, school projects, and curriculum needs. Students also have a place to study and research in the library, an area that is equipped with a photocopier, printer and computers.

There is a full time librarian available to assist students in finding and retrieving materials as well as providing help in research, computer use, and developing information literacy skills. Books are readily available to students through displays, features, personalized lists, and a special new books section. Students can request a book or ask the librarian for reading suggestions. For more information, contact the librarian by email: ybailey@emsb.qc.ca

Westmount High school library is featured in the Arts & Life section of the National Post.

 

Regard Catalogue

 

Click here to search our catalogue for the book you want!

Services

Hours:

  • 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM - Monday to Friday
  • 9:10 AM to 4:00 PM – Wednesday

Students have access to the library before school, recess, lunch, and after school.

Loans and Returns

Students can borrow graphic novels (i.e. comics) for 2 weeks and fiction and non-fiction books for 3 weeks. Any of those items can be renewed for another 2 weeks if another student has not requested it. It is the students’ responsibility to return materials on time. A fine of 10 cents per day is in effect for all late loans.

Students are expected to pay for any book lost or misplaced.   If you have overdue materials and/or outstanding fees by the end of the school year, you WILL NOT receive your Report Card until you have cleared up your account.

Printouts – It costs 5 cents for every page printed.

We do not currently have a photocopier.

Rules and Regulations

  1. Students must follow all school rules and conduct of behaviour as outlined in the agenda.
  2. No food or drink permitted in the library.
  3. School bags are not permitted in the library.

 

Literary Events

 

Author Visits

Ishmael Beah read from his memoir, A long way gone: memoir of a child soldier to a captivated audience at Westmount High school.

 

Canadian Author Visits

Blue Met Festival at Westmount High! Friday May 2nd, 2014,  Monique Polak visits again, along with Sarah N. Harvey. Both writers will discuss their publications with Orca Book Publishers.

 

    • Monique Polak and Lori Weber hosted a creative writing workshop to Cycle 2 students on November 19, 2007.
    • Brian Doyle presented to an excited group of Cycle 1 students on November 21, 2007. Five lucky students won autographed copies of his anthologies!

       

      Literacy Campaign

       

      • At Westmount High, promoting literacy is a school-wide effort. During Freedom to Read Week, teachers and staff members will be featured in a poster campaign reading their favorite books!
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Plagiarism

 

      Plagiarism is an illegal act involving the theft of intellectual and literary works. There is a zero tolerance in cheating. Students’ assignment goals are to learn and develop critical thinking and writing.

 

What is Plagiarism?

You steal someone’s work

    • You copy someone’s work without acknowledging the author or source
    • You copy and paste from a book, web site, magazine, or encyclopaedia
    • You replace an original text with a few words of your own or use a thesaurus
    • You use a video, photo, audio, or music clip infringing copyright laws
    • You use another student’s work with or without permission and claim as your own

 

How to avoid Plagiarism

Read the text first, process the information, then make notes efficiently by:

 

  • Summarizing common knowledge, facts, statistics, and background information
    Paraphrasing an author’s idea, theory, opinion, or concept in your own words with a citation or reference in the bibliography
    Writing a direct quote in the author’s words with a citation

Remember to write down the bibliographic information as you make notes! Example:

  •  
  • Student research guide: library and learning resources. (2003).

        Toronto: Toronto District School Board

 

 

 

      Copyright is a statutory privilege extended to creators of works that are fixed in a tangible medium of expression. (Bruwelheide, 1995, 4)

Only the owner of works can reproduce, copy, distribute, perform, display, publish, and create derivatives.

 

Guidelines for Fair Use

  1. Purpose and character of use; works copied for education, non-profit, or personal. Ask yourself ‘’what do I want to use the material for?”
  2. Nature of the work Fact – Use common knowledge, quotations, citations, or references Fiction – Do Not Copy! Give credit where credit is due.
  3. ‘’Borrowed’’ material Quantity – smallest amount possible - 10% Quality – heart of the work – Do Not Copy!
  4. Marketability Royalties given for the work copied and sold. Is there a possibility of copyright infringement? Do Not Copy!

Sites for further information on Plagiarism and citations

http://www.plagiarism.org

http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource

 

Westmount Public Library

 

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Click here to visit the Westmount Public Library

As a student, you can get a free membership to the Westmount Public Library! On the other side of the park you’ll find free Internet access, help researching your assignments, books, magazines, a young adult section designed just for you and much more. Their teen book club meets every month. If you don’t find what you’re looking for – ask at the Reference Desk or drop a note in their suggestion box.

 

SUMMER READING LIST

Here are some suggestions for books you could read over the summer.  Look for them in your public library, or make a list of the ones that interest you and borrow them when you come back to school in September.